Simplicity is a form of art...

Abstracting infrastructure complexity
by Sven Vermeulen, post on Fri 25 December 2020

IT is complex. Some even consider it to be more magic than reality. And with the ongoing evolutions and inventions, the complexity is not really going away. Sure, some IT areas are becoming easier to understand, but that is often offset with new areas being explored.

Companies and organizations that have a sizeable IT footprint generally see an increase in their infrastructure, regardless of how many rationalization initiatives that are started. Personally, I find it challenging, in a fun way, to keep up with the onslaught of new technologies and services that are onboarded in the infrastructure landscape that I'm responsible for.

But just understanding a technology isn't enough to deal with its position in the larger environment.

Working on infra strategy
by Sven Vermeulen, post on Sun 04 October 2020

After a long hiatus, I'm ready to take up blogging again on my public blog. With my day job becoming more intensive and my side-job taking the remainder of the time, I've since quit my work on the Gentoo project. I am in process of releasing a new edition of the SELinux System Administration book, so I'll probably discuss that more later.

Today, I want to write about a task I had to do this year as brand new domain architect for infrastructure.

Project prioritization
by Sven Vermeulen, post on Tue 18 July 2017

This is a long read, skip to “Prioritizing the projects and changes” for the approach details...

Organizations and companies generally have an IT workload (dare I say, backlog?) which needs to be properly assessed, prioritized and taken up. Sometimes, the IT team(s) get an amount of budget and HR resources to "do their thing", while others need to continuously ask for approval to launch a new project or instantiate a change.

Sizeable organizations even require engineering and development effort on IT projects which are not readily available: specialized teams exist, but they are governance-wise assigned to projects. And as everyone thinks their project is the top-most priority one, many will be disappointed when they hear there are no resources available for their pet project.

So... how should organizations prioritize such projects?

Structuring infrastructural deployments
by Sven Vermeulen, post on Wed 07 June 2017

Many organizations struggle with the all-time increase in IP address allocation and the accompanying need for segmentation. In the past, governing the segments within the organization means keeping close control over the service deployments, firewall rules, etc.

Lately, the idea of micro-segmentation, supported through software-defined networking solutions, seems to defy the need for a segmentation governance. However, I think that that is a very short-sighted sales proposition. Even with micro-segmentation, or even pure point-to-point / peer2peer communication flow control, you'll still be needing a high level overview of the services within your scope.

In this blog post, I'll give some insights in how we are approaching this in the company I work for. In short, it starts with requirements gathering, creating labels to assign to deployments, creating groups based on one or two labels in a layered approach, and finally fixating the resulting schema and start mapping guidance documents (policies) toward the presented architecture.

Switching focus at work
by Sven Vermeulen, post on Sun 20 September 2015

Since 2010, I was at work responsible for the infrastructure architecture of a couple of technological domains, namely databases and scheduling/workload automation. It brought me in contact with many vendors, many technologies and most importantly, many teams within the organization. The focus domain was challenging, as I had to deal with the strategy on how the organization, which is a financial institution, will deal with databases and scheduling in the long term.

Making the case for multi-instance support
by Sven Vermeulen, post on Sat 22 August 2015

With the high attention that technologies such as Docker, Rocket and the like get (I recommend to look at Bocker by Peter Wilmott as well ;-), I still find it important that technologies are well capable of supporting a multi-instance environment.

Being able to run multiple instances makes for great consolidation. The system can be optimized for the technology, access to the system limited to the admins of said technology while still providing isolation between instances. For some technologies, running on commodity hardware just doesn't cut it (not all software is written for such hardware platforms) and consolidation allows for reducing (hardware/licensing) costs.