Matching MD5 SSH fingerprint

Today I was attempting to update a local repository, when SSH complained about a changed fingerprint, something like the following:

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@    WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED!     @
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
IT IS POSSIBLE THAT SOMEONE IS DOING SOMETHING NASTY!
Someone could be eavesdropping on you right now (man-in-the-middle attack)!
It is also possible that a host key has just been changed.
The fingerprint for the ECDSA key sent by the remote host is
SHA256:p4ZGs+YjsBAw26tn2a+HPkga1dPWWAWX+NEm4Cv4I9s.
Please contact your system administrator.
Add correct host key in /home/user/.ssh/known_hosts to get rid of this message.
Offending ECDSA key in /home/user/.ssh/known_hosts:9
ECDSA host key for 192.168.56.101 has changed and you have requested strict checking.
Host key verification failed.
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Using multiple OpenSSH daemons

I administer a couple of systems which provide interactive access by end users, and for this interactive access I position OpenSSH. However, I also use this for administrative access to the system, and I tend to have harder security requirements for OpenSSH than most users do.

For instance, on one system, end users with a userid + password use the sFTP server for publishing static websites. Other access is prohibited, so I really like this OpenSSH configuration to use chrooted users, internal sftp support, whereas a different OpenSSH is used for administrative access (which is only accessible by myself and some trusted parties).

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