Lots of new challenges ahead

I’ve been pretty busy lately, albeit behind the corners, which leads to a lower activity within the free software communities that I’m active in. Still, I’m not planning any exit, on the contrary. Lots of ideas are just waiting for some free time to engage. So what are the challenges that have been taking up my time?

One of them is that I recently moved. And with moving comes a lot of work in getting the place into a good shape and getting settled. Today I finished the last job that I wanted to finish in my appartment in a short amount of time, so that’s one thing off my TODO list.

Another one is that I started an intensive master-after-master programme with the subject of Enterprise Architecture. This not only takes up quite some ex-cathedra time, but also additional hours of studying (and for the moment also exams). But I’m really satisfied that I can take up this course, as I’ve been wandering around in the world of enterprise architecture for some time now and want to grow even further in this field.

But that’s not all. One of my side activities has been blooming a lot, and I recently reached the 200th server that I’m administering (although I think this number will reduce to about 120 as I’m helping one organization with handing over management of their 80+ systems to their own IT staff). Together with some friends (who also have non-profit customers’ IT infrastructure management as their side-business) we’re now looking at consolidating our approach to system administration (and engineering).

I’m also looking at investing time and resources in a start-up, depending on the business plan and required efforts. But more information on this later when things are more clear :-)

After SELinux System Administration, now the SELinux Cookbook

Almost an entire year ago (just a few days apart) I announced my first published book, called SELinux System Administration. The book covered SELinux administration commands and focuses on Linux administrators that need to interact with SELinux-enabled systems.

An important part of SELinux was only covered very briefly in the book: policy development. So in the spring this year, Packt approached me and asked if I was interested in authoring a second book for them, called SELinux Cookbook. This book focuses on policy development and tuning of SELinux to fit the needs of the administrator or engineer, and as such is a logical follow-up to the previous book. Of course, given my affinity with the wonderful Gentoo Linux distribution, it is mentioned in the book (and even the reference platform) even though the book itself is checked against Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora as well, ensuring that every recipe in the book works on all distributions. Luckily (or perhaps not surprisingly) the approach is quite distribution-agnostic.

Today, I got word that the SELinux Cookbook is now officially published. The book uses a recipe-based approach to SELinux development and tuning, so it is quickly hands-on. It gives my view on SELinux policy development while keeping the methods and processes aligned with the upstream policy development project (the reference policy).

It’s been a pleasure (but also somewhat a pain, as this is done in free time, which is scarce already) to author the book. Unlike the first book, where I struggled a bit to keep the page count to the requested amount, this book was not limited. Also, I think the various stages of the book development contributed well to the final result (something that I overlooked a bit in the first time, so I re-re-reviewed changes over and over again this time – after the first editorial reviews, then after the content reviews, then after the language reviews, then after the code reviews).

You’ll see me blog a bit more about the book later (as the marketing phase is now starting) but for me, this is a major milestone which allowed me to write down more of my SELinux knowledge and experience. I hope it is as good a read for you as I hope it to be.