Testing with permissive domains

When testing out new technologies or new setups, not having (proper) SELinux policies can be a nuisance. Not only are the number of SELinux policies that are available through the standard repositories limited, some of these policies are not even written with the same level of confinement that an administrator might expect. Or perhaps the technology to be tested is used in a completely different manner.

Without proper policies, any attempt to start such a daemon or application might or will cause permission violations. In many cases, developers or users tend to disable SELinux enforcing then so that they can continue playing with the new technology. And why not? After all, policy development is to be done after the technology is understood.

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