The Linux ".d" approach

Many services on a Linux system use a *.d directory approach to make their configuration easily configurable by other services. This is a remarkably simple yet efficient method for exposing services towards other applications. Let's look into how this .d approach works.

Take a look at the /etc/pam.d …

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Comparing performance with sysbench: memory, threads and mutexes

In the previous post, I gave some feedback on the cpu and fileio workload tests that sysbench can handle. Next on the agenda are the memory, threads and mutex workloads.

When using the memory workload, sysbench will allocate a buffer (provided through the --memory-block-size parameter, defaults to 1kbyte) and each …

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Why would paid-for support be better?

Last Saturday evening, I sent an e-mail to a low-volume mailinglist regarding IMA problems that I'm facing. I wasn't expecting an answer very fast of course, being holidays, weekend and a low-volume mailinglist. But hey - it is the free software world, so I should expect some slack on this, right …

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nginx as reverse SMTP proxy

I've noticed that not that many resources are online telling you how you can use nginx as a reverse SMTP proxy. Using a reverse SMTP proxy makes sense even if you have just one mail server back-end, either because you can easily switch towards another one, or because you want …

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qemu monitor cd change

I've been playing around with kvm (which uses qemu) to try out other operating systems and Linux distributions. Up until now, little progress on that part (not because it is difficult, just little time) but there are a few things worth mentioning. For this post, let's start with a quicky …

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