I keep on struggling to remember this, so let's make a blog post out of it ;-)

When the SELinux policy is being built, recent userspace (2.4 and higher) will convert the policy into CIL language, and then build the binary policy. When the policy supports type attributes, these are of course also made available in the CIL code. For instance the admindomain attribute from the userdomain module:

...
(typeattribute admindomain)
(typeattribute userdomain)
(typeattribute unpriv_userdomain)
(typeattribute user_home_content_type)

Interfaces provided by the module are also applied. You won't find the interface CIL code in /var/lib/selinux/mcs/active/modules though; the code at that location is already "expanded" and filled in. So for the sysadm_t domain we have:

# Equivalent of
# gen_require(`
#   attribute admindomain;
#   attribute userdomain;
# ')
# typeattribute sysadm_t admindomain;
# typeattribute sysadm_t userdomain;

(typeattributeset cil_gen_require admindomain)
(typeattributeset admindomain (sysadm_t ))
(typeattributeset cil_gen_require userdomain)
(typeattributeset userdomain (sysadm_t ))
...

However, when checking which domains use the admindomain attribute, notice the following:

~# seinfo -aadmindomain -x
ERROR: Provided attribute (admindomain) is not a valid attribute name.

But don't panic - this has a reason: as long as there is no SELinux rule applied towards the admindomain attribute, then the SELinux policy compiler will drop the attribute from the final policy. This can be confirmed by adding a single, cosmetic rule, like so:

## allow admindomain admindomain:process sigchld;

~# seinfo -aadmindomain -x
   admindomain
      sysadm_t

So there you go. That does mean that if something previously used the attribute assignation for any decisions (like "for each domain assigned the userdomain attribute, do something") will need to make sure that the attribute is really used in a policy rule.


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